What do I want to do with my LIFE? (Part 1 of ~365)

Well, here it is. I’m at the infamous crossroads between adulthood and adulthood. Between college and “the real world.” Between headaches and bigger headaches.

You get the gist.

I’m currently graduating next month (August 12th if you want to be specific) and I am terrified. 

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I love going to school in Boston, but I’m moving back to the smallest (and possibly most boring state) at the end of August and trying to not be poor. Or something. Because right now I’m like 

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I’m getting my BA in writing, literature, and publishing so basically I’d like to think I have options…but then again at my little part time job every time I tell someone “Oh, I’m going into magazines/writing” they respond with something like, “Oh no sweetie, all the magazines are shutting down!”

Thanks.

But then sometimes people tell me how great it is that I can write and went to college and I feel like saying, “Oh well that’s all well and good, let’s hope I use my writing skills for more than filling out a Burger King application!” hyuck hyuck hyuck.

I guess it’s not really a problem of what I want to do, it’s basically where I want to do it. I already know what I want to do! I want to be able to write for a magazine, or online, and if that doesn’t work I am a great editor/copy editor (you know, when I’m not sitting at my blog in gym clothes eating a pb&j). 

I’ve seen things like this 

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from Slate

that show me that my best bet is in NYC. But here’s the thing: I don’t really want to live in NYC. Without getting too serious/depressing/boring, I don’t do very well with…seasons. I get kind of sad in the winter time, and want to head somewhere a little more sunny. And consistent. You know, like maybe California? LA is 2nd on that journalism job list, but there are probably over double the amount of opportunities in NYC than in LA. But when you read things on the internet about LA vs. NYC it’s hard to motivate yourself to think living in another city that’s dark and wet and cold for 1/3 of the year (or more?!) is appealing. 

At the same time, I think I’m young enough to make a “mistake” and spend some time in LA. Even if I hate it and move away, I mean hey, at least I made a mistake in LA. How bad could that be? Pretty bad for my wallet, but I mean…otherwise.

We’ll have to see where it goes. But for now, I’m stuck in Boston for another month so I may as well enjoy it.

If any of you readers here live in LA or NYC (or have lived in both?!) let me know your thoughts!

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On the recent cover of Rolling Stone Magazine.

This is probably an unpopular opinion, and I was afraid to share it at first, but since I’m going into the journalistic field I figured I needed to be brave.

I don’t usually write controversial pieces or anything mildly serious for that matter, but I felt the need to say something about this issue.

Let me start by saying a few things. I currently live in Boston and have lived in New England all my life. I was a few blocks away from the attacks when it happened, and that day and week was the most upsetting and terrifying couple of days I’ve ever experienced. I mourn the victims of the attacks and pray for their family and friends, and believe the first responders deserve all the praise in the world. And I, perhaps most importantly, am not one of those psychotic girls that worship the Tsarnaevs.

That being said, I’d like to share some articles that share a similar opinion.

Why the outrage over Rolling Stone’s Boston bomber suspect cover is a mistake

  • “I would argue what is inciting people here, in part, is the ugly truth of Tsarnaev’s story; that a kid who looks like he could be the backup singer in a boy band somehow, allegedly, became a bomber capable of such carnage.”

Rolling Stone’s Boston Bomber Cover Is Brilliant

  • “We may want the media to reconfirm for us that psychopaths are crazednuttycreepy recluses whom we can easily identify and thus avoid. But, as this cover reminds us, that simply isn’t the case.”

Don’t stone ‘Rolling Stone’ over Boston bomber cover

  • “While the full text of the article isn’t scheduled to be released until Friday, it hardly sounds like a puff piece. Here’s the cover type: “THE BOMBER,” followed by, “How a Popular, Promising Student Was Failed by his Family, Fell Into Radical Islam and Became a Monster.”

    I don’t know about you, but to me calling somebody a monster doesn’t sound much like glorifying him.”

I must admit that when the cover first surfaced I went along with the masses and was aggravated, upset, furious. But then I stopped and thought about it. The Rolling Stone is not solely an entertainment magazine, it has done political and controversial pieces before such as the cover with Charles Manson on the front that has been surfacing recently. They have also had political figures such as Obama on the cover, and he is neither a criminal or entertainer (however, I’m sure there are people who would say otherwise).

Many people are upset over the picture that was chosen for the cover. Would people be less upset if they used a picture such as this instead? Perhaps. But what is extremely eerie about the cover photo is that Tsarnaev looks almost average, which contradicts the notion that all murderers and criminals look like monsters and can be easily picked out by anyone anywhere at any time. By choosing this cover image, and the words that are on the cover (remember, they call him a monster), the magazine hopes to educate us and break the trend of what the media usually feeds us about terrorists and that in and of itself is terrifying. But does that mean that they need to be censored? No, I don’t believe so. A number of stores in New England have already stated that they will not be selling the issue. For a nation so proud of freedom of speech and freedom of the press, this seems contradictory to what we stand for. The article has been deeply researched, and well thought out. The magazine has also released a statement regarding the cover.

Our hearts go out to the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing, and our thoughts are always with them and their families. The cover story we are publishing this week falls within the traditions of journalism and Rolling Stone’s long-standing commitment to serious and thoughtful coverage of the most important political and cultural issues of our day. The fact that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is young, and in the same age group as many of our readers, makes it all the more important for us to examine the complexities of this issue and gain a more complete understanding of how a tragedy like this happens.

In short, the people at Rolling Stone set out to educate us, and had the courage to provide us with well-researched information that we might have not received otherwise. Before boycotting the magazine, or becoming furious, read the article when it comes out tomorrow keeping in mind that this was meant to teach us something and save your opinions until then. I plan to do the same.

 

UPDATE: Here is the link to the full article. I have yet to read it, but I will post my opinion afterwards. http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/news/jahars-world-20130717

Closing Time.

Couldn’t I think of a more creative title? How about “Good Riddance”? “Don’t You Forget About Me”? “The Graduation Song (Friends Forever)”?

I think “Closing Time” is suitable for this situation, I suppose.

Today was my last day at my internship. I know I haven’t written much about it (this is relatively new to me, ya know) but I’m sure in the next week I’ll go on a posting frenzy and talk about everything I’ve done here, all whilst crying in a bowl of Gorilla Munch cereal.

I worked at a print/online entertainment magazine for about two months–36+ hours a week. When I first went there I was terrified–I had little confidence in myself as a writer and always felt really uncomfortable just putting myself out there. It’s scary being around people that are so talented and well-known and I’m this little intern that waddles in not knowing what Drupal is or how to properly transcribe (still not that good at it..).

Over the weeks I became less scared and more confident with writing and taking initiative in the office. Some days were slow, but sitting in that environment for 9.5 hours four days a week were exhilarating nonetheless.

They even let me cover a few events, which is something I never imagined myself doing. I didn’t own a recorder (thank God for Best Buy) nor have I ever interviewed someone other than a college student or professor before. My first interview was with Michael C. Hall (for about three minutes, but still). The minutes leading up to it I had a full on panic attack for the first time since high school and was convinced I was going to just pass out/throw up during the interview. I took some deep breaths, put on my big girl panties (I always carry a few extra just in case I need some extra girl power) and followed the rep into a small room. Once I sat down on the couch I found myself not gushing over Dexter or asking him to slice my cheek, but having a conversation like a normal human being…and then promptly leaving.

I felt empowered! I met one of my favorite actors and found out that he was, in fact, human–like me.

My second event was at a fancy Los Angeles restaurant for an indie movie premiere party. There were actors and actresses there—notably Rashida Jones and Andy Samberg. I was once again anxious until I met with them face-to-face and thought, “Wow, they’re really nice people.”

People.

Working at the magazine made me realize a lot of things, but mainly this: actors, actresses, singers, etc are all just people. I began feeling sorry for celebrities every time I saw on Facebook what people were saying about them or the articles about crazy fans online (seriously…Justin Bieber fans are ridiculous). I kind of began to understand why celebrities would flip off the paparazzi or…you know, just punch them.

I learned how to report on celebrities in a respectful way, and avoid anything that wasn’t fact (or at least confirmed by their representative). I no longer had such a wary view on entertainment journalism, but in fact, enjoyed it.

Today, however, was my last day. I haven’t cried (yet), but I have bought a $7 chocolate covered strawberry from Godiva and ate some pasta (gluten free, of course).

After being there for 2 months, I probably didn’t make a huge impression on the company. I’m one person out of many interns, and many interns will come after me, and my name might just get lost in the emails one day. I recall a few days ago I said to another intern, “I’m afraid they’ll forget about me.” To which she responded, “They will. Just being honest.”

They may not remember me (although I hope they do!) but I will remember them. The two-month experience that woke up the confidence inside me and made me think and feel things I never thought I was able to before this (positive thoughts about myself? Who am I?).

The next few days will be spent packing up my small studio apartment into boxes and mailing them away. Saturday I’ll be hopping on a plane from LAX to TF Green and saying goodbye to the west coast for now, and returning to my low-middle class life on the east coast, working at a cashier in a department store. In September, I’ll have three more semesters at my school and I’ll graduate the end of summer ’13.

I feel kind of weird about it all right now and feel a bit ungrounded, but it’ll be nice to get away from the hustle and bustle for a month and see my friends (did I mention how much I miss them?). And who knows, maybe I’ll come back some day.